Maus Box Activity Guide (From 3 Months)

This guide has been carefully and lovingly crafted for you and your little one. Here you can find how to use each of the toys in your Tribu Box, how they help baby's brain development plus, some bonus activities you will both enjoy. If your baby's napping and you've got a minute, we also added some hopefully interesting facts about your baby's development at the end of this guide. During this stage we will focus on cause and effect, longer attention span, finer coordination, improved vision, depth perception, among others.

Remember! This guide is merely a proposal. You are the expert when it comes to your baby, so feel free to adapt each toy and/or activity as you feel appropriate.

All summarised and crystal clear for busy you.

I. Your Tribu Toys

Gobbi Mobile

The Gobbi Mobile basically screams Montessori. It's probably one of the most recognizable Montessori baby materials. These beautiful, artsy and airy mobiles are made from a single color spheres in varying hues.

What it is for

  • To stimulate focus
  • To introduce chromatic gradation
  • To encourage longer concentration periods
  • To improve visual discrimination

How to use it

  • From month 3 onwards
  • Hang it at 30-35 cm distance from baby's eyes.
  • Position Baby on their back.
  • Feel free to blow it or move it
  • Let baby observe it, never grasp it.
  • Hang it over the movement area, not the sleep area or the changing station.
  • Try to resist interfering, baby might need some time to observe the mobile.
  • Give Baby a break, they may look away from the mobile if it is too stimulating.

Stylised Dancer Figures Mobile

This shiny mobile is made of four stylised forms representing dancing human figures. Each dancer's head, arms and legs can move independently, giving baby a dazzling performance of light!

What it is for

  • To train muscles
  • To train binocularity
  • To introduce depth perception
  • To stimulate gaze switching
  • To aid detail perception
  • To stimulate focus and concentration

How to use it

  • From month 3 onwards
  • Hang it at 30-35 cm distance from Baby's eyes.
  • Position Baby on their back.
  • Don't blow or move, it moves with air.
  • Let baby observe it, not grasp it.
  • Hang it over the movement area, not the sleep area or the changing station.
  • Try to resist interfering, baby might need some time to observe the mobile.
  • Give Baby a break, they may look away from the mobile if it is too stimulating.

Three Coloured Spheres

As Baby starts to learn to move, it is the perfect time to introduce a tactile mobile. This mobile is meant to be touched, grabbed and kicked. Yeah, Baby!

What it is for

  • To train eye-brain coordination
  • To aid visual development
  • To stimulate reaching, grasping and batting

How to use it

  • From month 3-4 onwards
  • Build the mobile by attaching (approx. 15cm) strings and hanging them equally spaced to one another. See picture.
  • Hang it firmly and safely, within Baby’s reach.
  • Position Baby on their back.
  • Encourage reaching and grasping
  • Feel free to move the spheres
  • Keep the mobile close to baby's legs, so they can also kick the spheres.

Mirror Toy

This large baby-safe mirror is perfect for self-discovery and fun games. It keeps your baby entertained during tummy time, giving them more time to develop their muscles.

What it is for

  • To stimulate focus
  • To introduce self-recognition
  • To Learn cause and effect
  • To extend Tummy time

How to use it

  • From month 4 onwards
  • Place it in front of Baby, between 20-30 cm or until they can see their reflection
  • Use it during tummy time or when Baby is on their back.
  • Bring it close to baby's hands, they might surprise you and grab it
  • Give them time to explore their own reflection

Rattle with bell

This baby rattle promotes early sensory perception and improved motor skills. This toy is not only great for Baby's first musical attempts, but the soft wood is also well suited for those teething months.

What it is for 

  • To establish the connection between movement and noise
  • To aid the itchiness of those teething months

How to use it

  • From month 4-5 onwards
  • Present the toy to the baby. Move it gently.
  • Bring it close to baby's hands until they are able to grab it themselves
  • Let them explore, once they grab it.
  • Bonus use: Hang it 20cm from Baby's reach and use it as a " tactile mobile".

Sensory Ball

This colourful soft ball is super easy to grab. With it, Baby will discover different types of textures, sounds and features.

What it is for  

  • To practice hand control
  • To foster auditory development

How to use it

  • From month 4 onwards
  • Present the toy to baby
  • Make it ring and squeeze it until it catches their attention
  • Leave it at baby's reach during tummy time
  • Let them explore, once they grab it
  • Use a different word to describe each fabric to Baby: “soft”, “rough”, “smooth”.
  • Show different activities Baby can do with this ball: roll it, drop it in a box, squeeze it, etc.
  • Bonus use: Hang it 20cm from Baby's reach and use it as a " tactile mobile".

Hand to hand disk

This organic and sustainably sourced disk is perfect for Baby to grasp, examine, move from one hand to the other, and of course, to taste! Due its unique shape, it cannot roll far away, so baby can get right back to it if they drop it.

What it is for

  • To learn cause and effect
  • To strengthen left and right side brain connections
  • To develop grasp, strength, motor skills and body control
  • To induce curiosity
  • To practice hand to hand transfer and hand-eye coordination

How to use it

  • From Month 5
  • Bring it close to baby's hands until they are able to grab it.
  • Gently pull for added exercise, once baby grabs it
  • Remember to exercise both arms
  • Let them explore it with their hands, eyes and mouth.
  • Tummy time tip: place it 20cm from baby's reach

II. Activity ideas

Keeping your baby busy, happy and engaged in activities you feel confident are developmentally good for them, is one of the biggest challenges of having a little one at home. And, to be clear, not every moment your little one is awake needs to be filled with new, flashy learning activities for baby. Every opportunity for simple, active play is a chance for baby to learn more about their body and the world around them and for new skills to emerge.

Communication & Social

  • Copy-Cat Chit-Chat: Encourage baby to make noise by responding as if you two were in a very interesting conversation. This will teach them the give and take of communication and you may even hear some adult-intonated babbles with time.
  • Happy Songs: Count and wiggle baby’s fingers and toes as you sing your favourite songs. Repeating rhymes help with early language skills, awareness, communication, focus and concentration.
  • On and Off: Show baby how to turn things on and off including, lights, faucets, etc. Repeat “On!” or “Off!” each time. This helps them learn new words and sets the foundation for understanding cause and effect.
  • Funny Faces: Make different faces at baby. It may look silly to you but you'll not only entertain them (and probably your partner too) but help them focus their eyes on objects.

Motor

  • Supported Stand: Hold on to baby’s trunk in a standing position on your lap. Lift them slightly up and down and see if they want to put their weight on their feet. They'll be thrilled to feel this.
  • Up and Down: Lift baby up high above your head and bring them back down low. This will help develop their sense of balance and body position. Plus, they'll have lots of fun and you'll likely get some baby giggles.

  • Sightseeing: Place baby in a carrier or baby wrap while you move around the house. This helps baby develop their sense of balance and body position.
    • Roll Roll: Lie down next to baby and put them on their side, supported by a rolled-up blanket. Talk to them, so they reach for you until they roll over. Clap when they do! This helps baby strengthen core muscles to prepare for future milestones
    • The Explorer: Try holding out toys for baby to reach while he's on the floor while using your voice and facial expressions. This helps baby improve neck and head control, strengthen back, shoulder muscles and core.
    • Rattle Shakes: Try placing a rattle above baby’s chest, between knees, or out to the sides. Don’t forget to let baby shake it! Helps them develop motor skills by encouraging them to reach for toys and hold them.

      Cognitive

      • Toy Challenge: Hold baby on your lap. Try to get them to reach for a toy and help them switch the toy from one hand to the other. Helps baby work on hand-eye coordination.
      • Ring Ring: Gently place a small ring toy around baby’s foot, lift the foot into baby's view and encourage them to reach for it. Helps baby work on hand-eye coordination and core strength.
      • Sit On Up: If baby's ready and you are comfortable with it, you could place baby in sitting position on the floor with their hands in front of their legs so they can push themselves up using their arms. This strengthens their muscles.
      • Lean and Reach: If baby's ready and you are comfortable with it, you could place baby in a sitting position, place toys out of their reach so they have to shift their weight and move to get the toy. Helps baby develop motor skills.

        Sensorial

        • Nature Walks: Go for a walk outside and let baby hear the sounds around them. This exposes baby to new sensations.
        • Household Hub-Bub: Squeeze toys or newspapers to make different noises. Repeat sounds at different volumes and in different orders to keep them interested. This helps baby develop motor and listening skills.
        • Body Massage: After a bath or during changing, gently massage baby from top of head to bottom of feet. Helps baby bond with you, and aids focus and sense of touch.